Carnival of Prophets
(by Bindy Kincaid, Columbus, Ohio)

We will be decorating the building with a few balloons and streamers and signs.

When the kids enter the building they will go to the first room and decorate treat bags until the activity starts. They will also be given a "ticket" with six circles on it. As they go to each of the next areas they will get a sticker in each circle and at the end they exchange their tickets for corndogs, cotton candy and punch.

The kids will be split up in groups of two or three (we will have 15 kids at the most, but you could adapt this to a bigger group in many ways.)

Each group will start at a different area and spend 15 minutes at each one and then they will rotate.

The areas:

Joshua:

the teacher reads the story of Joshua and the walls of Jericho from the Scripture Reader. The kids then each get a party horn that "blows out" and they try to knock down a paper wall by blowing their horns. Then they put their horns in their treat bag and go to the next area.

Brother of Jared:

story of the rocks from the Scrip. Reader. Kids paint rocks with glow in the dark paint. Teacher then lights a black light bulb and they watch their rocks glow in the dark. They take their rocks at the end of the activity when they have dried.

Jonah:

story from scripture reader. The kids "catch" a plastic fish from a small bowl of water. Each fish has a number. Each number has a question about prophets. After they try to answer the question they get some gummy fish to put in their bags.

Samuel the Lamanite:

Story from reader. The kids each get to decorate an imitation leather bracelet using markers and copying some of the letters from the writing on the golden plates. They keep their bracelets.

Elijah:

Read story where the birds feed him - from the reader. Kids make styrofoam glider birds and practice flying them. They keep their birds.

Gordon B. Hinckley:

read the "Be" talk from the Ensign. Then they play pin the bee on the flower using chenille bees, which they get to keep.

All of these things that they take with them will remind them of the lessons they learned and most of them can be bought or even made for very little money.